Costa Rica Origin Trip - Ally Coffee Merchants
Last week seven roasters, shop owners and green buyers representing California, DC and New York joined Ally Coffee specialty division team members to share in the experience of Costa Rican coffee production. 

As a group we were collectively humbled and impressed by the dedicated work producers undertake to deliver superior microlot coffees. Growing and processing specialty microlots requires a level of continued commitment and effort that those of us in consuming countries hear about but rarely see. Experiencing this passion firsthand and hearing directly from producers and cooperatives about their meticulous yea-round work reminds us how lucky we are to roast, drink and share truly exceptional coffees. 

A glowing example of coffee's potential in the in Costa Rica is Finca Las Lajas in Poas de Alajuela in the mountains to the north of the country's capital of San Jose. As little as six years ago there was nothing where Las Lajas now produces exceptional micolots. Doña Francisa Chacon hosted our cupping and tour of the mill explaining that, "We're a family of six siblings, including myself. We wanted a family business that would do just that; keep business in the family. We set out to create jobs for each other and now we almost have more work than we can handle!"

Las Lajas' reputation for quality precedes it; the care with which the Chacon family manages their mill and processing has put their Honey and Natural coffees in steep demand. Doña Francisca proudly showcased the Red, Yellow, and Black Honeys drying on African beds and the different methods for drying Naturals, some of which are dried in deep layers under plastic and others that are dried on stacked beds. Doña Francisca's husband, Don Oscar, puts is this way: "We play with processing curves the same way roasters play with roast curves: adjusting the variables of time and temperature to see what characteristics appear in the cup." 

This curiosity and willingness to experiment and find a new level of excellence is apparent in the final product: explosively fruity coffees with complex acidity and a bright finish. 

Our next stop on Ally's Costa Rica origin trip took us clear across San Jose to a different breed of Costa Rican mountains: Los Santos de Tarrazu, where we cupped 20 different washed and honey microlots selected from among the 850 members of the Coopedota Cooperative. The diversity of coffees on the table(s) appealed to the range of tastes among cuppers and the overall quality of the microlots spoke to Coopedota's experience in producing clean coffees that embody the essence of Costa Rican acidity and depth. 

Coopedota was founded in 1960 by a small group of producers who put up the necessary $250 in capital and evolved into the regional hub for education and innovation it has become. The mill's main facility in Santa Maria de Dota is equipped to process lots of all scales and the Providencia Eco Mill handles smaller lots. 

Cooperative President Roberto Mata says, "Coopedota is an organization where the average size of a member's property is two hectares. Alone he or she cannot do much, but once we get together you can see the assets we have built." Producers who do not have enough land to support the construction of a micromill can still see their coffees sold as conscientiously processed microlots through the coop.

Costa Rica's coffee producing culture and the coffees they have to offer are truly unique the world over. The humble, resilient attitudes of the people behind them offer a final product that is every bit as human as it is delicious.



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Costa Rica Origin Trip

Feb 21, 2016


Last week seven roasters, shop owners and green buyers representing California, DC and New York joined Ally Coffee specialty division team members to share in the experience of Costa Rican coffee production. 

As a group we were collectively humbled and impressed by the dedicated work producers undertake to deliver superior microlot coffees. Growing and processing specialty microlots requires a level of continued commitment and effort that those of us in consuming countries hear about but rarely see. Experiencing this passion firsthand and hearing directly from producers and cooperatives about their meticulous yea-round work reminds us how lucky we are to roast, drink and share truly exceptional coffees. 

A glowing example of coffee's potential in the in Costa Rica is Finca Las Lajas in Poas de Alajuela in the mountains to the north of the country's capital of San Jose. As little as six years ago there was nothing where Las Lajas now produces exceptional micolots. Doña Francisa Chacon hosted our cupping and tour of the mill explaining that, "We're a family of six siblings, including myself. We wanted a family business that would do just that; keep business in the family. We set out to create jobs for each other and now we almost have more work than we can handle!"

Las Lajas' reputation for quality precedes it; the care with which the Chacon family manages their mill and processing has put their Honey and Natural coffees in steep demand. Doña Francisca proudly showcased the Red, Yellow, and Black Honeys drying on African beds and the different methods for drying Naturals, some of which are dried in deep layers under plastic and others that are dried on stacked beds. Doña Francisca's husband, Don Oscar, puts is this way: "We play with processing curves the same way roasters play with roast curves: adjusting the variables of time and temperature to see what characteristics appear in the cup." 

This curiosity and willingness to experiment and find a new level of excellence is apparent in the final product: explosively fruity coffees with complex acidity and a bright finish. 

Our next stop on Ally's Costa Rica origin trip took us clear across San Jose to a different breed of Costa Rican mountains: Los Santos de Tarrazu, where we cupped 20 different washed and honey microlots selected from among the 850 members of the Coopedota Cooperative. The diversity of coffees on the table(s) appealed to the range of tastes among cuppers and the overall quality of the microlots spoke to Coopedota's experience in producing clean coffees that embody the essence of Costa Rican acidity and depth. 

Coopedota was founded in 1960 by a small group of producers who put up the necessary $250 in capital and evolved into the regional hub for education and innovation it has become. The mill's main facility in Santa Maria de Dota is equipped to process lots of all scales and the Providencia Eco Mill handles smaller lots. 

Cooperative President Roberto Mata says, "Coopedota is an organization where the average size of a member's property is two hectares. Alone he or she cannot do much, but once we get together you can see the assets we have built." Producers who do not have enough land to support the construction of a micromill can still see their coffees sold as conscientiously processed microlots through the coop.

Costa Rica's coffee producing culture and the coffees they have to offer are truly unique the world over. The humble, resilient attitudes of the people behind them offer a final product that is every bit as human as it is delicious.




Noticia#1
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=> 'Costa Rica Origin Trip'
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=> '<p class=\"p1\"><span style=\"line-height: 1.45em; background-color: initial;\">Last week seven roasters, shop owners and green buyers representing California, DC and New York joined Ally Coffee specialty division team members to share in the experience of Costa Rican coffee production.&nbsp;</span><br></p><p class=\"p1\"><span class=\"s1\">As a group we were collectively humbled and impressed by the dedicated work producers undertake to deliver superior microlot coffees. Growing and processing specialty microlots requires a level of continued commitment and effort that those of us in consuming countries hear about but rarely see. Experiencing this passion firsthand and hearing directly from producers and cooperatives about their meticulous yea-round work reminds us how lucky we are to roast, drink and share truly exceptional coffees.&nbsp;</span></p><p class=\"p1\"><span class=\"s1\">A glowing example of coffee\'s potential in the in Costa Rica is&nbsp;Finca Las Lajas in Poas de Alajuela in the mountains to the north of the country\'s capital of San Jose. As little as six&nbsp;years ago there was nothing where Las Lajas now produces exceptional micolots.&nbsp;Doña Francisa Chacon hosted our cupping and tour of the mill explaining that, \"We\'re a family of six siblings, including myself. We wanted a family business that would do just that; keep business in the family. We set out to create jobs for each other and now we almost have more work than we can handle!\"</span></p><p class=\"p1\"><span class=\"s1\">Las Lajas\' reputation for quality precedes it; the care with which the Chacon family manages their mill and processing has put their Honey and Natural coffees in steep demand. Doña Francisca proudly showcased the Red, Yellow, and Black Honeys drying on African beds and the different methods for drying Naturals, some of which are dried in deep layers under plastic and others that are dried on stacked beds. Doña Francisca\'s husband, Don Oscar, puts is this way: \"We play with processing curves the same way roasters play with roast curves: adjusting the variables of time and temperature to see what characteristics appear in the cup.\"&nbsp;</span></p><p class=\"p1\"><span class=\"s1\">This curiosity and willingness to experiment and find a new level of excellence is apparent in the final product: explosively fruity coffees with complex acidity and a bright finish.&nbsp;</span></p><p class=\"p2\"><span style=\"line-height: 1.45em; background-color: initial;\">Our next stop on Ally\'s Costa Rica origin trip took us clear across San Jose to a different breed of Costa Rican mountains: Los Santos de Tarrazu, where&nbsp;we cupped 20 different washed and honey microlots selected from among the 850 members of the Coopedota Cooperative. The diversity of coffees on the table(s) appealed to the range of tastes among cuppers and the overall quality of the microlots spoke to Coopedota\'s experience in producing clean coffees that embody the essence of Costa Rican acidity and depth.&nbsp;</span><br><span class=\"s1\"></span></p><p class=\"p1\"><span class=\"s1\">Coopedota was founded in 1960 by a small group of producers who put up the necessary $250 in capital and evolved into the regional hub for education and innovation it has become. The mill\'s main facility in Santa Maria de Dota is equipped to process lots of all scales and the Providencia Eco Mill handles smaller lots.&nbsp;</span></p><p class=\"p1\"><span class=\"s1\">Cooperative President Roberto Mata says, \"Coopedota is an organization where the average size of a member\'s property is two hectares. Alone he or she cannot do much, but once we get together you can see the assets we have built.\" Producers who do not have enough land to support the construction of a micromill can still see their coffees sold as conscientiously processed microlots through the coop.</span></p><p>
</p><p class=\"p1\"><span class=\"s1\">Costa Rica\'s coffee producing culture and the coffees they have to offer are truly unique the world over. The humble, resilient attitudes of the people behind them offer a final product that is every bit as human as it is delicious.</span></p><p class=\"p1\"><span class=\"s1\"></span></p><hr><p class=\"p1\"><span class=\"s1\"><img src=\"http://i63.tinypic.com/kd30xj.jpg\"><br></span></p>
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